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Workers’ Compensation

Newsworthy Category

Workers’ compensation statistics indicate good news for injured workers and employers in Minnesota

According to the latest Minnesota Workers’ Compensation System Report, which was released by the Department of Labor and Industry in April, insurance premiums for the 2018 calendar year are down 51 percent as compared with 1996, and are currently the lowest since that year, which is a good sign for employers who continue to strive to their workers’ safety on the job. Statistically, current work injuries add up to about 4 compensable claims per 100 full-time workers, which is more than a half lower than it used to in 1996. Despite this decrease in injuries and claims, according to the...
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Workers’ Compensation Coverage for Repetitive Trauma and Overuse Injuries

If your job requires you to do a lot of repetitive activities, such as gripping tools, reaching for objects, twisting, turning, bending, working overhead, or doing other movements in excess of what you would expect to be doing in your natural environment, you may notice that, over time, your body parts involved in those frequent repetitive activities start becoming painful or difficult to use. For example, you may notice that your right shoulder starts to lose its range of motion or that it is painful to reach overhead, or your back starts bothering you with lifting, or that your knees...
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Madelia Times Messenger features Yuri Jelokov

Yuri Jelokov of the Farrish Johnson Law Office was featured in the Madelia Times Messenger newspaper this week.  Yuri practices in the areas of workers compensation, social security and disability claims.  Read more about his interesting history, his family and his practice in the Madelia Times Messenger.  Yuri is also a member of the Madelia Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Director.  Visit him at our Madelia office on Wednesdays!  

How Long Can I Stay on Work Comp?

Minnesota workers’ compensation system provides several options and guaranteed time limits for receiving wage loss benefits for injured workers. In general, you can continue receiving wage loss benefits for up to 130 weeks from the time you become unable to work, so long as you cannot return to your regular work, and your employer is not able to accommodate your work restrictions. In most cases, however, injured workers are able to go back to work before that period runs out. When that happens, so long as your medical restrictions continue to be in place, you would be eligible for up...
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No Overtime After Work Injury?

It is not unusual for an injured worker to be put on work restrictions following his or her injury at work. This sometimes can drastically affect that worker’s ability to earn their regular wages and put food on the table, especially if restrictions limit the number of hours they can work while in recovery. The limitations are typically 20 or 40 hours per week maximum. But what is the injured worker to do if he or she is used to relying on the overtime earnings to pay the bills? This issue usually arises when the overtime earnings are not very...
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Can I Get Fired If I Claim Workers’ Compensation?

We often hear this question from folks with recent work-related injuries who have never been hurt before or never thought about reporting a work injury and never had to deal with workers’ compensation. Since each case is unique, there is no straight answer that could be given without knowing more details. Generally, however, the law provides that any employer who fires or is threatening to discharge an injured worker because he or she is seeking workers’ compensation benefits, can be held liable for up to three times the value of the work comp benefits awarded. In other words, although technically...
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Injuries on Your Way to Work

If you get hurt on your way to or from work, your injuries may be covered by workers’ comp. Although, in general, injuries sustained by an employee while commuting to and from work are outside of the workers’ compensation coverage, there are some exceptions. In a recent decision of Hohlt v. University of Minnesota, the Minnesota Supreme Court held that a state employee was entitled to workers’ compensation benefits for the injuries she sustained when she slipped and fell on an ice-covered sidewalk curb ramp while walking to her car after work. The fact that she was not on the...
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America’s 10 Most Dangerous Occupations and How Work-Related Fatalities are Treated by the Minnesota Workers’ Compensation System

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics December 16, 2016, Economic News Release, there were a total of 4,836 recorded work injuries that resulted in death in 2015, which amounted to an overall rate of fatalities of 3.38 per 100,000 full-time workers. While there are multiple contributing factors, like workers’ age, training and experience, based on the government statistics, your chances of getting killed on the job are much higher if you work in the following occupations: 1. Farming, fishing, and forestry occupations – 25.3 (deaths per 100,000 workers) 2. Supervisors of construction and extraction workers – 16.1 3....
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Your Workers’ Compensation Questions Answered

What happens when my doctor takes me off work or puts me on restrictions because of my work injury? The answer depends on your line of work and how bad your work injury is. When you get hurt, your doctor may decide that you should take some time off work or limit your work activities. For example, if you pull a muscle in your back or injure your shoulder, and your job requires you to do heavy lifting or use your arms a lot, your doctor will write a Report of Workability that will either order you to stay off...
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How Workers’ Compensation Claims Start

After injury or sickness has occurred on the job, it is the employee’s responsibility to start the workers’ compensation process and the first step is reporting the event or incident to the employer. Reporting the injury to your employer is an important part of the process. It is called “giving a notice” to the employer. There are many ways to notify the employer about the injury. It could be as simple as telling the supervisor or manager about what happened, or giving a doctor’s note to the superiors or human resources, or any other way that conveys the message that...
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